Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Lloyd Sealy Library
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

OER AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE

OER Course Conversion Projects

 

             SOCIOLOGY 

 

 

 

 

The Sociology Department of John Jay College has a distinguished faculty of internationally known scholars in sociology, criminology, dispute resolution, and related areas and offers outstanding academic programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The department’s wide array of foundational, specialized, and interdisciplinary courses encourage students to develop a sociological understanding of the nature and structure of society and its institutions.

Classes in Sociology provide students with a comprehensive understanding of sociological theories and methodologies, as well as the research and analytical skills they need to work in and contribute to today's globally interconnected world. There is a focus on the globalized nature of our society and the intensification of inequalities and related demands for social justice. Students are provided with both traditional and groundbreaking theoretical and empirical understandings of crime – including its causes and consequences and how it is defined and processed.

The major in Sociology provides students with a comprehensive understanding of sociological theories and methodologies, as well as the research and analytical skills they need to work in and contribute to today's globally interconnected world. The major focuses on the globalized nature of our society and the intensification of inequalities and related demands for social justice. 

Program Learning Goals:

A graduate of this major should be able to:

  • Demonstrate through assignments and class discussion a sociological imagination, i.e., the ability to see connections between local, personal experiences and larger global, societal forces, and between individual troubles and pervasive social problems, in a global context.
  • Understand through readings and class discussion how the scientific study of society transcends common sense beliefs and conventional wisdom about people's attitudes and behaviors.
  • Test the veracity of research hypotheses and be able to formulate basic research questions to guide studies of societal behavior, processes, and institutions by using qualitative and quantitative methods of collecting evidence.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with written works of classic and contemporary sociological theories that explain why people think and act as they do.
  • Demonstrate an understanding and mastery of sociological concepts through writing, explanatory, and presentation skills.

         ZTC (Zero Textbook Cost) classes offered in the Department of Sociology:

              
                       Comments / Discussion